Ippudo Shojin Vegetarian Ramen, Ippudo Sydney

I love my Japanese food, and I love my ramen.

Picture this: my Japan trip, circa 2008. Our flight just arrived in Osaka from Australia. It was 5 degrees C outside, almost 9pm, raining cats and dogs, and we were starving. Starving I tell you (what do you expect from a 9 hour flight on a budget airline?)! Walked around the empty streets of Osaka, the sound of the pachinko machines echoing in the background, when we saw a stream of yellow light coming out of a narrow opened doorway. The smell of broth ushered us in, and we suddenly found ourselves inside a hole in a wall, 2 table ramen restaurant being manned by the happiest noodle-turning, broth bubbling ramen guy on this side of the planet. And the ramen? It was manna from heaven – tonkotsu broth, noodles, boiled egg, chashu (pork slices), nori (seaweed), shinachiku (seasoned bamboo shoots), sesame seeds, and a hint of garlic. H E A V E N.

Tori Shoyu Special: simmered pork belly, roasted seaweed, flavoured black mushroom and bamboo shoots, spring onions.

Back home in Australia, my love for ramen continues and one of my favourite spots to get my ramen fix is Ippudo. Have you tried their ramen? And pork buns? And sake-based cocktails? No? Do yourself a favour – grab a spot now and order these three pronto. These are my go-to meal fix especially when I’m feeling nostalgic about my Japan trip. Thanks to Narisa from SD Marketing and Ippudo, I received a very generous invitation to try out their SHOJIN Vegetarian ramen – a lightly brothed soup with whole grain noodles, served with deep fried vegetable kakiage (fried vegetable bits – carrots, corn, etc) and soy protein wrapped in seaweed. A quick search on the Ippudo website showed me that:

The term “SHOJIN” is not just a vegetarian ramen, but one that adheres to strict Buddhist principles. Its aim is to bring out the original flavours of the ingredients and is a cuisine of devotion to details.

Shojin Vegetarian Ramen
Ippudo Sydney bar

We were also treated to an array of Ippudo’s ‘bests’: Pork Bun, Unagi Gohan (grilled eel on rice), and the uber drinks Tokyo Sunrise (sake, grapefruit juice, lychee juice, grenadine), Ippudo Ginjo (Ippudo original house sake), and Ginrei Umeshu on the rocks (plum wine – YUM!).

Thanks to SD Marketing and Ippudo Sydney for the invitation and the warm welcome, dinner, and drinks. Sugarlace & guests dined as guests of Ippudo Sydney. Special thanks to the Ippudo crew especially Mark who looked after us (and our other little guest, baby Talya!).

Ippudo Ginjo original house sake
Tokyo Sunrise: sake, grapefruit juice, lychee juice, grenadine
Ginrei Umeshu on the rocks: plum wine
Ippudo Pork Buns: steamed bun with braised pork and original Ippudo sauce.
Unagi Gohan: grilled eel on rice
Tori Shoyu Ramen toppings
Shojin Vegetarian Ramen broth & noodles
Shojin vegetable toppings

Ippudo Sydney
http://www.ippudo.com.au/
Address: Shop 5021, Level 5, Westfield Shopping Centre/188 Pitt Street Sydney Australia, 2000
Phone:(02) 8078 7020

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Mr J’s Sunday Steak & Veggies

I am blessed to have a husband that loves cooking and eating and shares my passion for everything in the kitchen. We time-share the custody of our kitchen space, and take turns planning for our weekly meals. On weekends though, we try and make Sunday lunch or dinner extra special. One of my most favourite dish to request is Mr J’s steak. He makes a mean tender, medium steak with a side of roast vegetables similar to ratatouille. I usually pair it up with a side salad, but on this occasion I whipped up a quick couscous with Moroccan spices.

Easy, tasty, healthy Sunday lunch… hubby style.

Mr J’s Tender Steak

Makes 2 servings

500g scotch fillet

Marinade:Lemon
Olive oil
Worcestershire sauce
Salt & pepper

1. Mix all the marinade mix in a shallow dish. Marinade the fillet in the mixture for about 1 hour.
2. In a hot grill pan, grill the steak according to preference. For medium, cook the steak for approximately 4 minutes on each side.
3. Remove from the pan and set aside to rest.
4. Once rested, slice and set aside.

Mixed Roast Veggies

Makes approximately 2 servings

1 zucchini, chopped in large chunks
1 carrot, chopped in large chunks
1 onion, chopped in large chunks
1 green capsicum, chopped in large chunks
1 tomato, chopped in large chunks
1 tinned tomatoes1 tbsp Mixed herbs

1. Preheat oven to 200 deg C.
2. In a large baking dish, place all ingredients and cover with aluminum foil. Put in the oven and roast for approximately 20 minutes.
3. Toss the vegetables, and place back in the over for another 10 minutes or until the vegetables are tender.
4. Remove from the oven.

Couscous with Moroccan spices

Makes 4 servings
This recipe is similar to my Pearl Couscous recipe here.

1 cup couscous
1/2 cup sultanas
2 tbsp Morrocan seasoning
1 tomato, diced
Small bunch of parsley, chopped roughly
Salt & crushed pepper
Juice of 1 lemon

1. Prepare couscous according to packet directions (ie 1 cup couscous to 1 1/4 cups boiling water or stock).
2. Add all ingredients together. Leave to cool for a bit, serve warm with vegetables and steak.

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Kulinarya Cooking Club May: Pancit

Welcome to the wonderful world of Kulinarya Cooking Club’s May theme, Pancit.

Pan-what?

Pancit. Noodles. You know, that Chinese ingredient that represents long life and is perfect in soups, stir fried, or somethings even as filling in spring rolls Vietnamese style!

But we’re not talking about China or Vietnam, we’re here for good old Las Islas Filipinas!

Pancit was first introduced to the Filipino by way of the Chinese merchants who immigrated to the Philippines to trade business with the country. The Chinese brought with them different cultural influences that over time were adopted by the Filipinos – may it be in cuisine, language, practices or beliefs.

I myself am a product of this multi-racial, bi-lingual heritage: my grandfather was a refugee from China who was exiled to the Philippines. There he met my grandmother, a full blooded Chinese but was born in the Philippines. They met, got married and had plenty of kids (ok, 6 of them including my mum). Eventually my mum met my dad, a full blooded Filipino, and had us who then eventually (trust me I’m almost in the ending) went to a Chinese school in the Philippines but for the life of me still can’t speak Chinese fully.

What I can do, however, is cook. And cook I did, for this month’s Kulinarya Cooking Club theme.

There are so many different varieties of pancit, depending on which region in the Philippines you come from or which recipe you’ve learned, however in the end there’s always going to be one staple ingredient: noodles. Whether you mix it with vegetables, seafood, pork, chicken or beef, Pancit always goes back to noodles, noodles, noodles. Oh, and one more Chinese tradition that we keep when eating Pancit? There’s always Pancit on someone’s birthday for longevity.

This recipe is similar to the Chopsuey recipe covered in the past, only with more broth as the noodles soak up alot of liquid. This Pancit recipe uses bihon, a rice noodle similar to vermicelli but somewhat thicker in size.

Pancit Bihon

Serves approximately 2 people

1 tbsp olive oil

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 onion, chopped

1 carrot, sliced

1 medium cluster broccoli

50g snow peas

1 cup chicken or vegetable broth

1 tbsp fish sauce

A few sploshes of sesame oil

Salt & pepper

100g bihon noodles

Calamansi or lemon or lime (for serving)

  1. Saute garlic and onions in olive oil. Add the fish sauce, broth and salt & pepper.
  2. Add the “hard” vegetables – eg carrots. Put on lid and cook until vegetables are partly cooked.
  3. Add the “green” vegetables – eg broccoli, snow peas. Put on lid and cook for about 3 minutes.
  4. Add a few sploshes of sesame oil for aromatics. Put on lid and let the steam cook the vegetables for a minute or two.
  5. Remove cooked vegetables until only the “sauce” or broth is left in the pan. Add the noodles and cook until softened. Add the vegetables again and stir to combine.
  6. Serve with a slice of calamansi or lemon wedge.

Kulinarya Cooking Club was started by a group of Filipino foodies living in Sydney, who are passionate about the Filipino culture and its colourful cuisine.

Each month we will showcase a new dish along with their family recipes. By sharing these recipes, we hope you find the same passion and love for Filipino Food as we do.

If you’re interested in joining our Kulinarya Cooking Club, please feel free to drop by our foodblogs and leave a comment – we would love to hear from you!

Say hello to the other members of the Kulinarya Cooking Club!
Olive – http://www.latestrecipes.net/
Caroline – http://whenadobometfeijoada.blogspot.com/
Ninette – http://bigboldbeautifulfood.blogspot.com/
Peach- http://www.thepeachkitchen.com/
Althea- http://www.busogsarap.com/
Asha – http://forkspoonnknife.blogspot.com/
Malou – http://www.impromptudiva.com/
Cherrie – http://sweetcherriepie.blogspot.com/
Acdee – http://acdee.blogspot.com/
Valerie – http://www.acanadianfoodie.com/
Sheryl – http://crispywaffle.com/
Divina – http://www.sense-serendipity.com/
Anna – http://www.anniesfoodjournal.blogspot.com/
Dahlia – http://www.energychef.blogspot.com/
Joy – http://joyjoycreativeoutlet.blogspot.com/
Maribel – http://www.foodgeek.webs.com/
Tressa
Jen – http://www.jen-at-work.blogspot.com/
Pia – http://bisayajudkaayo.blogspot.com/

And of course… Kath of A Cupcake or Two and Trissa of Trissalicious!

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